Art is only a three-letter word, but as they say, “big things come in small packages.”

It means so much to me and to an ever-growing network of people that I have had the pleasure of meeting in my two years here at University of Maine at Farmington. For my whole life, the arts have been an essential part of who I am and I know they will continue to be as important to me in the future. I have had the privilege of fostering my love for so many different areas of the arts here at this beautiful little school. Costume Design, Photography, Journalism, even Administration – these are all both old and new-found loves for me.

 

I am an Art Administration student and it couldn’t be a better fit for me.  My favorite part about the major is that it’s new. Everyday I can see how it’s shifting and evolving and I get to be a part of that change. In just two, short years I will be tackling the ever-changing world of art. My passion for creativity paired with my business background will help me achieve success. My brain is colorful and creative as well as black and white and logical; these are qualities that help me thrive as an art administration student.

 

I wasn’t too involved in the artistic community during my first semester here, a regret of mine, but I have definitely made up for it in my past few semesters. My first dip in the artsy waters here was working one on one with Beth Dorr, a costume designer, as a part of Jayne Decker’s Space Lab and Performance class. There, I helped alter and pull costumes for the performance of “Keely and Du.” Working in costume design through the Space Lab class as well as the Costume Design class I am enrolled in this semester has given me some incredible opportunities. Together with my class, I made the costumes for the performance of  “The Tempest” directed by Jayne Decker. Now, I am currently designing costumes for a one act I am directing myself, called “Write Me a Love Scene.” Working with this incredible mentor through these experiences has taught me to deeply respect and love the craft. These opportunities I’ve taken advantage of will help me for my upcoming summer job as the costume designer at a children’s summer theatre camp in Smithfield, Maine.

 

I have also opened my eyes to photography recently. It is a hands on and technical form of art in which I can express myself, but there is still some left-brained science to it. I enjoy photography because it allows me to capture the beautiful things of our world, which others may not take the time to see. My first “look through the lense,” as you might say, was last May when I accompanied Ralph Granger on his yearly trip to England and Spain for a photography class. I was blown away by the beauty of the world and it’s different people, places and cultures. I was humbled by the experience of travel; learning how the technicalities of photography can create beautiful pictures was just icing on the cake.

Journalism is yet another new artistic interest of mine. For the past two semesters I have worked as the Webmaster for the Farmington Flyer. There, I have gotten to work with new technologies and marketing techniques, which is excellent experience for my future in art administration.  This semester I have also worked as the editor of the new arts journal, “Knack”, as part of Steve Pane’s Project 2 class. With “Knack”, the class and I write articles pertaining to everything going on in the arts in and around Farmington. Our goal is to show our appreciation for all types of arts, explore our individual fields, and educate those around us about arts events in the area. Working with “Knack” has been a phenomenal opportunity and I am excited about all of the things I’m learning through its production. As editor I’ve had to manage lots of ideas and people, bringing every creative mind together to make one really great thing.

 

It’s interesting that I found Art Administration as an actual major at UMF, because ever since I was a little girl arts leadership has been a passion of mine. When I was little I would always take on that leadership role, helping the teacher hang up our class paintings in an aesthetic way or dressing up my sister and her friends and having them put on a little play. When I got a little older and entered high school, I organized a monthly acoustic music event at a local arts center. I gathered young musicians, marketed the events, did the catering myself, and even sold tickets at the door. These acoustic nights are some of my best memories of high school  and knowing that I made it all happen makes it that much sweeter. Last summer, that arts center hired me as the in-house Arts Administrator. I was in charge of marketing art classes via radio and internet, handling payments and accounting work, as well as planning evening events. Working there really gave me the confidence I needed to let me know I’m right where I belong in the arts world.

 

All of these experiences I have had thus far, and those I will have in my future at UMF, have helped me grow as a person and as an artist. Everything – art forms I’ve learned in classes and hobbies I do on my own – are things I can turn around and share with my community of artists. I believe that is the essence of art administration and what I hope to do with my degree. I hope to add to the beauty of the world by helping creative souls achieve a common goal.

 

Finished Artist Statement

I’ve been working pretty hard writing and re-writing my artist statement and here is the final product:

Christina Hallowell is an Art Administration student with a concentration in Theatre at the University of Maine Farmington. She has loved beauty and all forms of art her whole life. Through photography, theatre, and art she uncovers the beautiful things of the world so that others may share in her experience. Inspired by the minute details of everyday life, Christina enjoys looking at the world through new perspectives which continue to inspire her artistic philosophy.  However creative and artful she may be, Christina’s strength in this field is administration. She excels in leading others to be talented, thoughtful, and successful creators of art.

I’ve been a huge fan of Brandon Stanton’s “Humans of New York” work for about 4 years now. I first found out about his blog because it was advertised on my personal Tumblr dashboard. It was this photo. Image

I was intrigued. The look of this man’s face was honestly just pure happiness. For one minute of his life he was able to feel childlike and free. The blurry people in the background help achieve the feeling that this man was the only one that mattered. For one fleeting moment, he was the star of the show. I immediately wanted to know more of his story.

Since then, Stranton has been sharing bits and pieces of people’s stories from all over one of the world’s greatest cities, New York City. His goal is to create an interactive map of faces and to reach 10,000 photographs from every neighborhood, street, nook and cranny in NYC. He has currently met and recorded the stories of 5,000 citizens and visitors of the big apple.

It’s hard to describe what emotion his photos evoke in me. I always feel somewhere in between wonder and contentment. Stanton always knows what exactly to say and that’s the part I find most fascinating. What do I mean by that? Well, when Stanton takes a photo of a NYC citizen, he also has a chat with them. He discusses their biggest fear, their biggest regret, their advice to other “Humans of New York.” Stanton says that sometimes he talks with these strangers-turned-friends for an hour, about anything they like. What does he do with all of their wisdom they just handed to him? He takes a single thread in the quilt of stories they just weaved and he captions the photo. That’s it. Stanton’s work is so pure. So simplistic. Sometimes a single sentence, sometime’s just two or three words explain the Human in the photograph. And honestly I never question it. I never yearn to know more. His ability to capture the essence of a person so easily astounds me and it makes me wonder what kind of story I’m advertising about myself everyday. It makes me wonder what I could learn from the people around me right here in Farmington, Maine, if it’s apparently so easy to learn about a person with just a few simple words. That ability to capture the essence is exactly what I love about photography, and Stanton does it ever so delicately and elegantly.

A mad, keen photographer needs to get out into the world and work and make mistakes. Sam Abell

hallowellc:

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That’s kind of what I’ve been missing, I think. The only time in my life that I took pictures i was really happy with was on my trip when I was forced and prompted to take pictures, hundreds of them, everyday. While in my class, I came home every night with tons and tons of pictures to sift through and edit. At first, I’d get one that I really liked out of all day of shooting. Towards the end, I’d only take maybe 100 or so pictures and I’d come out with 12 that I was happy with. That’s the key. To just get out there and do it. I’m not going to take a jaw dropping photograph if I dont bring my camera with me. Yesterday I went to Boston and I took 37 pictures and this is the only one I thought was semi “show-worthy.” My camera is always next to me and my thirst to create is not being quenched simply because I don’t take it out of its bag. If i do not prompt myself like my professor prompted me, I fear I will never get to that place where I’m happy with my work again. I have to almost force myself to just get out and try.

Originally posted on Photofocus:

A mad, keen photographer needs to get out into the world and work and make mistakes.

– Sam Abell  

View original

Project 2: Mary Lambert’s Body Love

Ilanka Kaplan of Interview Magazine sat down and talked with music newcomer, Mary Lambert, on her second EP (Welcome to the Age of my Body) which was released December 17, 2013. http://www.interviewmagazine.com/music/mary-lambert-welcome-to-the-age-of-my-body/#_ The singer/songwriter became famous when she recorded with Macklemore and Ryan Lewis on the award-winning song, “Same Love.” The first few paragraphs of the article introduced Mary as a singer/songwriter and as a person. Lambert is a curvy woman with lots of spunk, attitude, humor, but she is also very thoughtful and artful. The tone of Kaplan suggests that she is very respectful of and awed by what Lambert has done with her songs touching on issues of heartbreak, body image, sex and sexuality, and many more issues that we all face today. Through a script-style interview article, Kaplan shows us that Lambert is a special kind of celebrity, one who knows the importance of touching upon “untouched” issues, as well as taking time to self-nurture and have fun. 

photography.

profile
profile
transparent love
transparent love
pray
pray
the poet
the poet
whiskers
whiskers
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art
man's best friend
man’s best friend
Little Big Ben
Little Big Ben
I want to build a sandcastle
I want to build a sandcastle
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chandelier
perspective
perspective
carnival gal
carnival gal
innocence
innocence
explosion
explosion
sweet angel
sweet angel
like mother like daughter
like mother like daughter
poppies
poppies
my tossa, my tossa
my tossa, my tossa
church pew
church pew
rainy day
rainy day
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violin
life's but a walking shadow
life’s but a walking shadow
damned be he who moves these bones
damned be he who moves these bones
secret garden
secret garden

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stonehenge
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light
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tea time